These 3 Shoes May Be Contributing to Your Osteoarthritis

If you find your feet and calves are in pain after a long day at work, you may just shrug it off to spending too many hours standing. However, your feet and calves may be trying to tell you something — because that pain could be a sign of osteoarthritis. If you have the following three shoes in your closet, you may want to visit your doctor to check if you have osteoarthritis, because these shoes have been shown to contribute to the degenerative condition.

High Heels

Formally defined as any shoe higher than two inches, podiatrists and osteoarthritis experts agree that not only are these shoes bad for people with arthritis, but for anyone in general. “They’re hard on the arch and ball of the foot and can wear down joints,” says Bryan West, a podiatric surgeon based in Michigan.

Even more bad news for women who love their high heels, these shoes have actually shown to cause osteoarthritis. A study from a group of Stanford University scientists suggests that the strain of wearing high-heels of at least three-and-a-half inches can prematurely age knee joints and could contribute osteoarthritis.

Moral of the story — it’s best to leave those high heels on the sale rack and find a more comfortable shoe.

To see which other shoes can contribute to your osteoarthritis, check out Micha Abeles’ blog here.

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Medicines May Help to Prevent Arthritis

Every year The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR), which is an E.U.-based organization that represents the patient, healthcare professional and professional societies of rheumatology, holds the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology. This forum serves as a space where rheumatology professionals can connect with patient organizations, as well as to learn and engage with other professionals in rheumatology, all to achieve progress in the care of people who suffer from various autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

This year’s conference took place in Madrid, Spain. Among the thousands of presentations, one scientific session that stood out to me (in my review of the gathering) was a meta-analysis conducted by Bruno Fautrel, MD, PhD, of the Departments of Epidemiology, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology (from Pierre and Marie Curie University in Paris), and his colleagues. Their study suggests that the best way for patients with pre-rheumatoid arthritis to prevent a full onset of rheumatoid arthritis is to intervene with early therapy.

Patients who have pre-rheumatoid arthritis are at an important point in their medical care because this is the ideal time period to prevent full onset of rheumatoid arthritis. Patients and their providers should take into consideration contributing risk factors, such as smoking and obesity, and adjust their lifestyle accordingly. However, Fautrel and his colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of people with the disease and found that medical treatment could effectively prevent progression to rheumatoid arthritis.

To read more about the findings of this meta-analysis, visit Micha Abeles’ blog here.

About the Decision not to Take Osteoporosis Medications

Multiple factors contribute to the decision not to take osteoporosis medications, with fear of adverse events topping the list, say researchers in a paper published online in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association.

In the study, researchers collected information about 790 participants in the Patient Activation After DXA Result Notification study who had received prescriptions for new or different osteoporosis medications after a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Participants were interviewed at baseline and 12 and 52 weeks after their DXA scans, and researchers collected information such as patient demographics, health history, health habits, prior osteoporosis diagnosis or treatment, osteoporosis knowledge using the “Osteoporosis and You” scale, osteoporosis health beliefs, and osteoporosis self-efficacy.

Read the rest of this blog on Micha Abeles’ website here.

Millennials are Already Getting Arthritis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention determined that 54 million adults are diagnosed with arthritis, and not all of them are elderly as you would typically imagine. About 8 million millennials have been diagnosed with arthritis as well!

So what’s the cause of millennials getting diagnosed with this condition? It’s a combination of technology usage and excessive workouts that put too much use on their joints.

How Fibromyalgia Affects Your Sleep

Fibromyalgia is a rheumatic disease that causes muscle pain, stiffness, and fatigue. People with fibromyalgia commonly experience sleep problems, and a good night’s sleep is hard to come by for people who suffer from it. The pain makes sleeping difficult, and sleep deprivation makes the pain even worse. If you have fibromyalgia, here’s the scientific explanation of how and why the disease affects your sleep.

This blog post was originally featured on Micha Abeles’ website, michaabelesmd.com.

What Can Trigger a Raynaud’s Attack?

For those who have Raynaud’s disease, you may find that the blood vessels to your fingers and toes tend to overreact to certain situations by limiting blood flow — turning your fingers white or blue! The attack may only last a few minutes, but it leaves your extremities numb and throbbing.

This rheumatic phenomenon has doctors scratching their heads since there’s no known cause. However, there triggers out there that you can avoid to a few things make sure you don’t have an attack.

See the original post on Micha Abeles’ blog here