These 3 Shoes May Be Contributing to Your Osteoarthritis

If you find your feet and calves are in pain after a long day at work, you may just shrug it off to spending too many hours standing. However, your feet and calves may be trying to tell you something — because that pain could be a sign of osteoarthritis. If you have the following three shoes in your closet, you may want to visit your doctor to check if you have osteoarthritis, because these shoes have been shown to contribute to the degenerative condition.

High Heels

Formally defined as any shoe higher than two inches, podiatrists and osteoarthritis experts agree that not only are these shoes bad for people with arthritis, but for anyone in general. “They’re hard on the arch and ball of the foot and can wear down joints,” says Bryan West, a podiatric surgeon based in Michigan.

Even more bad news for women who love their high heels, these shoes have actually shown to cause osteoarthritis. A study from a group of Stanford University scientists suggests that the strain of wearing high-heels of at least three-and-a-half inches can prematurely age knee joints and could contribute osteoarthritis.

Moral of the story — it’s best to leave those high heels on the sale rack and find a more comfortable shoe.

To see which other shoes can contribute to your osteoarthritis, check out Micha Abeles’ blog here.

About the Decision not to Take Osteoporosis Medications

Multiple factors contribute to the decision not to take osteoporosis medications, with fear of adverse events topping the list, say researchers in a paper published online in the Journal of the American Pharmacists Association.

In the study, researchers collected information about 790 participants in the Patient Activation After DXA Result Notification study who had received prescriptions for new or different osteoporosis medications after a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Participants were interviewed at baseline and 12 and 52 weeks after their DXA scans, and researchers collected information such as patient demographics, health history, health habits, prior osteoporosis diagnosis or treatment, osteoporosis knowledge using the “Osteoporosis and You” scale, osteoporosis health beliefs, and osteoporosis self-efficacy.

Read the rest of this blog on Micha Abeles’ website here.